Last updated on January 6, 2021

Bedeck // Bedazzle | Illustration by Randy Vargas

Bedeck // Bedazzle | Illustration by Randy Vargas

Deck boxes. Every paper player needs them. Whether it’s to showcase your collection, keep your favorite cards safe, or protect your “I’m embarrassed to say how much this cost me” deck or cube, they’re a must.

There are as many deck boxes out there for you to choose from as there are formats. For any size there will be a box out there that will fit around it snugly, comfortably, and safely to protect what’s inside from harm.

I’m going to go over a ton of different deck boxes today, all of which will be tick those boxes that you’re looking for in a good deck box. I won’t be delving into boxes that aren’t worth your time, don’t worry. I will give you signs of cheapness to look out for, though, so you don’t get tricked into buying something that’s poor quality.

Treasure token (misc. promos) | Illustration by YW Tang

Treasure token (misc. promos) | Illustration by YW Tang

All the boxes you’ll see today will be a great choice for the purpose they’re meant to fulfill. Because that’s really the question you should be asking yourself: What do I need this deck box for?

Is it for a very expensive and loved Modern, Legacy, or Vintage deck? Is it for a fun EDH/Commander deck? Your favorite Cube? Or maybe you’re looking for simple boxes to hold your collection just so they have a neat place to be stacked away in. All of the deck boxes you can use for these things and everything else you should consider when buying deck boxes is covered here for your reading pleasure. We’re very much thinking inside the box today, if you catch my drift!

Tower Drake | Illustrated by Ryan Barger

Tower Drake | Illustration by Ryan Barger

Dimensions

The minimum dimensions your deck box should have for single sleeved cards is as follows (L x W x H):

  • 75 cards: 2.87 x 1.85 x 3.94 inch / 7.3 x 4.7 x 10 cm
  • 100 cards: 2.87 x 2.99 x 3.94 inch / 7.3 x 7.6 x 10 cm

Measurements for cubes are more difficult to assess apart from the minimum height and width (2.87 x 3.94 inch / 7.3 x 10 cm) because cubes vary in size. Rest assured that a number of options are included.

With all the products you’re about to see, I’ve included the number of cards that can go into them, from single to double sleeved.

Best Overall: A Quick Recommendation

Product
Ultra Pro Blue Satin Tower Deck Box
Quiver Time Black Collector Card Carrying Case – Card/Deck Storage Case with Wrist and Shoulder Strap, Dividers & Separators, Corner Pads + 100 Apollo Clear Card Sleeves – Deck Box Bag Compatible
Ultimate Guard 2020 Exclusive SidewinderTM 100+ Standard Size XenoSkinTM.
Image
Ultra Pro Blue Satin Tower Deck Box
Quiver Time Black Collector Card Carrying Case - Card/Deck Storage Case with Wrist and Shoulder Strap, Dividers & Separators, Corner Pads + 100 Apollo Clear Card Sleeves - Deck Box Bag Compatible
Ultimate Guard 2020 Exclusive SidewinderTM 100+ Standard Size XenoSkinTM.
Best for Commander
Best for Cube
Best for Constructed
Capacity
125 cards
1000 cards
100 cards
Price
$11.96
$44.90
Price not available
Product
Ultra Pro Blue Satin Tower Deck Box
Image
Ultra Pro Blue Satin Tower Deck Box
Best for Commander
Capacity
125 cards
Price
$11.96
Product
Quiver Time Black Collector Card Carrying Case – Card/Deck Storage Case with Wrist and Shoulder Strap, Dividers & Separators, Corner Pads + 100 Apollo Clear Card Sleeves – Deck Box Bag Compatible
Image
Quiver Time Black Collector Card Carrying Case - Card/Deck Storage Case with Wrist and Shoulder Strap, Dividers & Separators, Corner Pads + 100 Apollo Clear Card Sleeves - Deck Box Bag Compatible
Best for Cube
Capacity
1000 cards
Price
$44.90
Product
Ultimate Guard 2020 Exclusive SidewinderTM 100+ Standard Size XenoSkinTM.
Image
Ultimate Guard 2020 Exclusive SidewinderTM 100+ Standard Size XenoSkinTM.
Best for Constructed
Capacity
100 cards
Price
Price not available

If you want a solid deck box that is just all-round great for your deck here are my picks:

75 Card Decks

Ultimate Guard Sidewinder Ultimate Guard Sidewinder

100 single-sleeved, 80 double-sleeved cards

100 Card Commander Decks

Ultra Pro Satin Tower Ultra Pro Satin Tower

125 single sleeved, 100 double sleeved cards

Cube

Quiver Quiver Quiver Time Black Collector Card Carrying Case – Card/Deck Storage Case with Wrist and Shoulder Strap, Dividers & Separators, Corner Pads + 100 Apollo Clear Card Sleeves – Deck Box Bag Compatible

1000 single sleeved, 800 double sleeved cards

Buyer’s Guide

There’s a lot of elements that come into play when you’re considering a deck box. Things like fit, quality material, type of material, durability, sturdiness, design, aesthetics, weight, price, and purpose are all important to consider. Especially when the price of the cards you’re putting in them goes up. Let’s run down each element and some pointers to help you steer clear of bad choices and guide you to a deck box that suits your needs.

Fit

Angelic Destiny | Illustration by Jana Schirmer & Johannes Voss

Angelic Destiny | Illustration by Jana Schirmer & Johannes Voss

This looks like a simple one, but it can be tricky. I already went over the minimum measurements of a simple deck box up there, and your deck box shoulder at least meet those measurements.

It’s not unusual to come across deck boxes that are a little bit bigger, though, which is nothing to worry about as long as they’re not inches longer in all directions. I’m talking about deck boxes for 75 (60 main board, 15 sideboard) and 100 cards here. A Cube box should be much longer, for obvious reasons.

To make sure that the deck box you’re looking at is perfect for your intended deck, look in the description for words like “made for MTG cards.” In a pinch, “made for Pokémon/YuGiOh! cards” works too since they are the same size. This lets you know that the box should comfortably fit our MTG cards.

Drown in Sorrow | Illustration by Noah Bradley

Drown in Sorrow | Illustration by Noah Bradley

Then there are sleeves to consider. Luckily, many manufacturers now list the amount of unsleeved, sleeved, and sometimes even double-sleeved cards their box will hold. Usually a box for sleeves will be a little bit bigger, because sleeves make the cards a little bit bigger, so it’s only logical that the box holding them does the same.

You want a snug fit, but not too tight. If your cards are sloshing around in the box then it’s better to put that one back and look for a tighter fit. On the other hand, you don’t want to have to cram your cards in there. This makes bending a big risk and the cards could get stuck in the box. Not desirable. Look for a deck box that’s not too tight, not too loose, where the cards are comfortably handled when needed.

Quality and Type of Material

Vampiric Tutor | Illustration by Raymond Swanland

Vampiric Tutor | Illustration by Raymond Swanland

There are obviously many, many materials you can build a deck box from. But not all are great to make a deck box with, as you might have guessed. It’s not so much that a certain material is out of bounds, but more the way that it’s used and how much of it.

Let’s say a company uses cardboard. Just regular old cardboard. Now, you can make a solid deck box out of this material. If you press a bunch of layers together under high pressure you get something that’s sturdy. but when a company decides to use cardboard it’s usually an economical decision. The result is something that feels flimsy and weak more often than not. Not to mention that it falls apart if it ever gets wet.

What you want out of a deck box is something that feels solid, something that feels like it will protect your deck when you drop it, gets wet, gets knocked over, gets stuck, or just something unforeseen happens to it in general. How many times have you had a drink explode in your backpack?

Blood Moon | Illustration by Franz Vohwinkel

Blood Moon | Illustration by Franz Vohwinkel

The best judge of this is your hands and your eyes. Hold it in your hands, press it a little bit, fumble with it. Look at seams and the way it’s constructed. Shake it while your cards are in it. See if it gets marked with light handling.

If the sides are easily pressed in or corners are already peeling, then you might want to look at a different product. Of course, this all coincides with what you want out of your deck box. If it’s for simple storage or bulk cards, then maybe this type of box is perfect for you. If you’re buying it to protect something that means something to you and you want it to be secure, then the above applies.

Next to how solid and firm a product feels, there’s something to be said about the qualities of the material used. If you consider cardboard, you know that it’s not the toughest type of material. But things like leather, wood, polypropylene, and thick plastic are all solid materials that are tough and durable by their very nature. A deck box made of one or a multitude of these components is sure to have a longer shelf-life than cardboard or thin plastic.

It’s no surprise that the price can go up a bit for some of these materials, but there are some great affordable options out there that get the job of protecting your deck done. We’ll get to those options later on.

Durability and Sturdiness

Crushing Vines | Illustration by Scott Chou

Crushing Vines | Illustration by Scott Chou

This ties in with materials pretty neatly, I’ve even touched upon them slightly because they are linked. The better the quality of your deck box’s materials, the better the durability and sturdiness. Although the latter is not always an automatic.

Leather is durable, we all know that. But if you find a deck box made of a thin slice of leather, the sturdiness isn’t there. Your cards are in peril of being crushed or bent if something happens to the box.

If a manufacturer wraps or sews that thin leather around a wooden or hard plastic frame, then the sturdiness improves by leaps and bounds. It seems logical, but I wanted to make a point of this all the same so you don’t automatically jump on a deck box made of leather and think you’re good.

The same rules of feeling the box, seeing it, and handling it still apply. If you’re shopping online look for reviews on the brand or model. See what other people have said about the product. A bit of research goes a long way.

Design

Pride of the Perfect | Illustration by Lie Setiawan

Pride of the Perfect | Illustration by Lie Setiawan

When talking about design concerning deck boxes, it’s all about shape combined with the function. Actually, that’s design applied to any build. But as we’re talking about deck boxes let’s stay within that zone.

A great deck box is one that perfectly combines the shape to its function. A deck box that fits your deck perfectly and is easy to open and take your deck out but doesn’t fall open accidentally. A deck box where it’s easy to slide your cards in and out without unnecessary obstructions. A deck box that isn’t fancy, bulky, or oddly shaped just for the sake of it, but strengthens the functioning of the box. In other words, something that is well thought out.

Giving specifics on this is very hard because inventiveness is part of this field. You know certain deck boxes that work, where the design is perfect. But maybe there’s a design not yet thought of that does that job even better.

Lathiel, the Bounteous Dawn | Illustration by Lucas Graciano

Lathiel, the Bounteous Dawn | Illustration by Lucas Graciano

The best judge of this is use. Use the deck box and see how it operates. Do the cards snag when you place them inside or take them out? Does the closure feel solid? Are there protruding parts on the inside of the box? Are there on the outside? Is it easy to handle or is it a hassle?

A lot of this comes down to personal experience and the ability to actually hold and use the deck box. Of course, videos reviews can help to an extent, but ultimately using the box yourself will decide if it’s perfect for you and your needs.

“Needs” is not something to be overlooked, by the way. If you want something ornate and out-there because you want the box itself to be an object you can put on display, then your needs of design are different than if you’re a pro player that needs a deck box that’s easily transportable, is safe and secure, and holds your cards smoothly. A different shape and function applies to both and comes down to what you need your deck box to do.

Aesthetics

Enchanted Evening | Illustration by Seb McKinnon

Enchanted Evening | Illustration by Seb McKinnon

Aesthetics, or the look of something, is closely tied to design and need but plays more to your preference in how your deck box looks. Maybe you’re someone who likes clean and straightforward designs, or maybe you prefer something unique, or you like ornate and detailed.

It also ties back to materials. If you like the warm touch and feel of wood, then your aesthetics will prefer a deck box made of that material. The same goes for leather, or polypropylene, or biologically friendly materials. All of these apply the right type of aesthetic, or look, to the deck box that’s perfect for you.

The design of the deck box obviously attributes to its aesthetics, too. In a way it’s the combination of all the things I’ve listed above and also what’s listed below. The influence of the aesthetics of your deck box is tied to all of these and will decide how important a certain look is.

Weight

Heavy Arbalest | Illustration by David Rapoza

Heavy Arbalest | Illustration by David Rapoza

This one is maybe not something you think about when looking for a deck box. After all, you just want something that keeps your cards safely locked away until you need them. But think of this: what if you go somewhere where you really want to bring several of your favorite decks and it all has to fit in a backpack? A backpack that your carry around everywhere. For long periods of time. Weight becomes something you’ll notice after a while.

So while it’s beautiful to have all your decks in solid wooden or custom-made acrylic deck boxes, having to carry ten or more around in your bag will soon have you cringing in agony. Weight matters in that respect. If you’re someone who travels a lot with your decks, the weight of the boxes that hold them becomes an important thing to consider.

Price

Blood Price | Illustration by Antonio José Manzanedo

Blood Price | Illustration by Antonio José Manzanedo

All of the above will influence the price of your deck box, at least to an extent. There are great budget options for you out there. And when I say budget, I really mean quality. Yes, there are doozies out there that cost too much and are rubbish. But if you apply what I’ve written above and are willing to look at what’s to come below you’ll end up with the perfect deck box. Taking both price and all the other aspects I’ve mentioned into account.

To give you a broad idea of prices you can expect to encounter, look to spend anywhere between $2 to $500. It all depends on what you value more. If you value budget, you’ll be at the lower end. If you value uniqueness, you’ll be at the higher end.

Purpose

Baneslayer Angel | Illustration by Greg Staples

Baneslayer Angel | Illustration by Greg Staples

I’ve mentioned it before, but I feel the biggest influence on your choice of deck box is what you’re using it for. The reason why you need a deck box influences the fit, quality material, type of material, durability, sturdiness, design, aesthetics, weight, and price that you’re looking for.

Of course, this sounds a bit grand when thinking about deck boxes and it’s not something you’ll spend hours on. But just giving a little more thought to what it is you want your deck box for will help to make a purchase that’s perfect right from the start. In the end you’ll end up saving both time and money. Now let’s get to looking at some deck boxes, shall we?

Deck Boxes

The “Cadillacs” a.k.a., the Most Expensive

With this category, the word “custom” really applies. If you have a thousand or several thousand-dollar decks, then wanting a custom deck box to show it off is only logical. Many of these would make a great gift for an MTG player that you want to spoil, too.

There are a plethora of artists out there that can provide the perfect box for you, just look on Etsy.

There are a few artists that I’m going to highlight for you, though. These have all made their way to various outings on MTG channels in the past, may it be videos or articles. Their quality and craftsmanship can be vouched for:

XBeau Gaming

Hand crafted wooden deck boxes. Can be made to your specifics.

Prices start at approx. $55.00.

Aaron Cain Custom

Hand crafted wooden deck boxes and gaming supplies. Can be made to your specifics.

Prices for deck boxes start at approx. $42.00.

Leifkicker

Deck boxes made to order. Materials: acrylic, polyurethane, wood, and magnets.

Prices start at approx. $50.00.

Best Budget Deck Box

For every budget there’s a deck box and not having or wanting to spend much money doesn’t mean you can’t get a good quality one. I’ll be listing one for 75 cards, 100 cards, and Cube.

Ultra Pro Standard Deck Box

Ultra Pro Standard Deck Box

80 single-sleeved cards or 60 double-sleeved cards

Ultra Pro 100+ Deck Box

Ultra Pro 100+ Deck Box

125 single-sleeved cards or 100 double-sleeved cards

KMC Barrier Box 1000

KMC Barrier Box 1000

1000 single-sleeved cards or 800 double-sleeved cards

Best EDH/Commander Deck Box

With a deck that’s always 100 cards in size and can get very expensive very fast, you want your EDH/Commander deck well protected. Not to mention you might want to put in some extra tokens and bring along dice and such. Here are some great deck box options for you:

Ultra Pro Satin Tower

Ultra Pro Satin Tower

125 single-sleeved cards or 100 double-sleeved cards

Ultimate Guard Monolith

Ultimate Guard Monolith

125 single-sleeved cards or 100 double-sleeved cards

Ultimate Guard Flip’N’Tray 100

Ultimate Guard Flip’N’Tray 100

120 single-sleeved cards or 100 double-sleeved cards

Best Pro Deck Box

When you’re on the pro-circuit, getting to your cards quickly is paramount. You want to get to shuffling as quickly as possible, right? In between games you want to be sure your decks are safe and securely tucked away, too. These deck boxes are for you:

Ultimate Guard Sidewinder

Ultimate Guard Sidewinder

100 single-sleeved card or 80 double-sleeved cards

Dragon Shield STRONGBOX

Dragon Shield STRONGBOX

111+ single-sleeved cards or 100 double-sleeved cards

Ultimate Guard Boulder 80+

Ultimate Guard Boulder 80+

100 single-sleeved cards or 80 double-sleeved cards

Best Cube

Cube demands a deck box that’s almost more like a case. Something that can hold 700+ cards. Here are my picks for traveling safely with your beloved Cube deck:

Quiver Quiver

Quiver Quiver

1000 single-sleeved cards or 800 double-sleeved cards

Pirate Lab Small Card Game Case

Pirate Lab Small Card Game Case

900 single-sleeved cards or 700 double-sleeved cards

Kakapopo A6

Kakapopo A6

1000 single-sleeved cards or 800 double-sleeved cards

Best Double Deck Box

Sometimes it’s just handy to be able to store more than one deck in a deck box. Perhaps you have a twin deck, or a favorite 60/75 card deck and EDH/Commander deck you want to keep close at hand at all times. Here are some great options for you:

Ultimate Guard Twin Flip’N’Tray 160

Ultimate Guard Twin Flip’N’Tray 160

200 single-sleeved cards or 160 double-sleeved cards

BCW Vault 200

BCW Vault 200

200 single-sleeved cards or 180 double-sleeved cards

Dex Protection Creation Large

Dex Protection Creation Large

200 single-sleeved cards or 175 double-sleeved cards

Best Metal Deck Box

If you’re not into plastic, leather, wood, polyurethane, or acrylic deck boxes, maybe metal boxes are your go to. A couple are blasts from the past, but R.E.P. is one of the few who’s picked up the trade again with a very high-quality product. Take a look:

R.E.P. V2 Steel

100 single-sleeved cards or 90 double-sleeved cards

Ultra Pro Nesting

Ultra Pro Nesting

82 single-sleeved cards or about 60 double-sleeved cards

Rook Deck Box

80 single-sleeved cards or approx. 60 double-sleeved cards

Boxing It Up

Wow, if all those wonderful choices didn’t get your deck-box-heart pumping then you’re probably reading the wrong article. So many wonderful choices in all areas of boxing your deck away safe and sound it’s got my head spinning.

But in all seriousness, we’ve got some of the best choices out there for you to get your hands on. There’s something here for everyone no matter if you’re a budget player, a pro, a Cube player, or a Commander player, there’s something that suits your needs.

My personal favorites here are:

With that it’s time to box it all up and put a wrap on this one. I hope you have a great guide and line of products to look at when you’re considering a deck box. May the perfect one be housing your favorite deck(s) very soon!

As always, feel free to head on over to our blog if you want more awesome content. If you like our stuff and want to show your support, you can head on over to our Patreon. We greatly appreciate your support.

That’s all for now. Stay safe, stay healthy, and I’ll see you on the next one!

Quiet Contemplation | Illustration by Magali Villeneuve

Quiet Contemplation | Illustration by Magali Villeneuve

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